Keeping Space Between Yourself and Other People Outside of Your Home

Keeping Space Between Yourself and Other People Outside of Your Home

What is social distancing?

Social distancing also called “physical distancing,” means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home. To practice social or physical distancing:

  • Stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) from other people
  • Do not gather in groups
  • Stay out of crowded places and avoid mass gatherings

In addition to everyday steps to prevent COVID-19, keeping space between you and others is one of the best tools we have to avoid being exposed to this virus and slowing its spread locally and across the country and world.

When COVID-19 is spreading in your area, everyone should limit close contact with individuals outside your household in indoor and outdoor spaces. Since people can spread the virus before they know they are sick, it is important to stay away from others when possible, even if you have no symptoms. Social distancing is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.

Why practice social distancing?

COVID-19 spreads mainly among people who are in close contact (within about 6 feet) for a prolonged period. Spread happens when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, and droplets from their mouth or nose are launched into the air and land in the mouths or noses of people nearby. The droplets can also be inhaled into the lungs. Recent studies indicate that people who are infected but do not have symptoms likely also play a role in the spread of COVID-19.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. COVID-19 can live for hours or days on a surface, depending on factors such as sun light and humidity. Social distancing helps limit contact with infected people and contaminated surfaces.

Although the risk of severe illness may be different for everyone, anyone can get and spread COVID-19. Everyone has a role to play in slowing the spread and protecting themselves, their family, and their community.

Tips for social distancing

  • Follow guidance from authorities where you live.
  • If you need to shop for food or medicine at the grocery store or pharmacy, stay at least 6 feet away from others.
    • Use mail-order for medications, if possible.
    • Consider a grocery delivery service.
    • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others, including when you have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store.
      • Stay at least 6 feet between yourself and others, even when you wear a face covering.
  • Avoid large and small gatherings in private places and public spaces, such a friend’s house, parks, restaurants, shops, or any other place. This advice applies to people of any age, including teens and younger adults. Children should not have in-person playdates while school is out. To help maintain social connections while social distancing, learn tips to keep children healthy while school’s out.
  • Work from home when possible.
  • If possible, avoid using any kind of public transportation, ridesharing, or taxis.
  • If you are a student or parent, talk to your school about options for digital/distance learning.

Stay connected while staying away. It is very important to stay in touch with friends and family that don’t live in your home. Call, video chat, or stay connected using social media. Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations and having to socially distance yourself from someone you love can be difficult.

EE&G Responds to The Covid-19 Crisis

EE&G Responds to The Covid-19 Crisis

In times of crisis like the one we are experiencing, solidarity and humanity are present in many ways, and everyone gives their best to collaborate. This is the case of the EE&G Group, who has always been on the community’s side to make it easier to help solve the difficulties in doing so.

Who is EE&G?

The EE&G Group dates back to 1986 and has been in business for over 33 years. EE&G has built its reputation in the Environmental Industry by providing quality and diversified expertise to its clients with an array of Contracting Services including; Environmental Contracting & Construction, Disaster, Restoration, Air Conditioning & Mechanical Contracting Services.

EE&G is headquartered in Miami Lakes, Florida, with convenient locations strategically selected in the States of Florida and Georgia. Today, thanks to their unsurpassed customer service and its multidisciplinary team of professionals, the EE&G brand has reached national recognition as experts in the Environmental Remediation, Restoration, and Construction Industry. Their experience is indisputable and today is recognized as experts by many institutions in the public and private sectors.

Currently, many companies are requesting their services for cleaning and disinfection of working areas, as is one specific case in South Florida, where EE&G responded to the community as soon as the COVI-19 Pandemic started by helping the City of Miami Lakes and his team of volunteers, with the sanitation, disinfection cleaning at the COHEA (City of Hialeah Educational Academy), where food delivery takes place every Friday in an effort to help the community and especially those most affected by COVID19 in the area.

“At this time of crisis we want to do everything we can to help all residents stay safe,” says one of EE&G’s employees.

EE&G is maintaining CDC guidance and cleaning protocols, in all their projects across Florida and Georgia states.

EE&G is assisting Clients to -prepare Covid-19 Disinfection Response plans for their buildings, so if and when an incident occurs, they are ready to respond and experience minimal downtime.  Be conservative and be prepared, as we all will be living with the presence of this virus for the immediate future.  They are working hard to assist public and private clients de such as temporary hospitals, police departments, and daycare facilities, residential buildings, hotels, and more.

If we all put our grain of sand, thinking about the common good and not the proper, as EE&G is doing, we will get out before this crisis that affects us all equally.

They can help you Protect your Biggest Assets; Your Employees and Your Operational Ability! For help with cleaning and disinfecting services call 866.334.9111 or get a free quote. 

coronavirus

COVID-19 Dos and Don’ts for Everyone

DO wash your hands for at least 20 seconds, several times a day. Use soap and water or a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol:

  • Before cooking or eating
  • After using the bathroom
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

How to Wash Your Hands

Scrub away! There’s a correct way to wash your hands and get rid of germs.

DON’T touch your eyes, nose, and mouth. If you have somehow come into contact with the virus, touching your face can help it enter your body.

DO learn the symptoms, which are similar to flu:

Fever
Cough
Shortness of breath

Most cases do not start with a runny nose.
DON’T wear a mask unless you’re sick. Masks help protect others from catching the virus, but wearing one when you’re healthy won’t do much. Demand has been so high worldwide that shortages have begun. Leave the masks for people who really need them, like sick or health care professionals.

DO consider taking extra precautions and staying out of public places if you’re over 60 years old, or have a condition, as you have a higher risk of developing the disease. Note that as of now, the highest-risk groups appear to be seniors and people with preexisting conditions like heart disease, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes.

DON’T travel if you have a fever. If you get sick on the flight, tell the crew immediately. When you get home, contact a health professional.

DO reconsider travel to affected countries, especially if you have underlying conditions. For people in a higher-risk group -- seniors and people with preexisting conditions -- the agency suggests postponing nonessential travel. It also suggests everyone avoid cruises. Find the latest advisories here.

DON’T panic. At this point, public health officials still say the risk of becoming infected with COVID-19 is low. Taking proper precautions -- wash your hands! -- and making preparations are the best things you can do.

DO get ready to hunker down. The World Health Organization has now declared COVID-19 to be a pandemic. If someone in your home gets sick, local authorities may want you to be quarantined for up to 14 days. Make sure you have enough shelf-stable food to last that long, as well as prescription medications for anyone in the family, other health supplies such as over-the-counter pain relievers, and disinfectants to clean household surfaces. A government web site also suggests keeping a 2-week supply of food and water in the case of a pandemic and having copies of electronic health records.
DO practice “social distancing”: Avoid large gatherings and crowds in poorly-ventilated spaces, and try to stay at three to six feet away from anyone who’s coughing or sneezing.
DON’T skip the flu shot. The symptoms of COVID-19 and flu overlap enough that it can complicate diagnosis. If you’ve had a flu shot, you’re less likely to catch the flu or have a case serious enough to require treatment.
DO prioritize your health. Now is not the time to burn the candle at both ends, skip workouts, or ignore a healthy diet—that can weaken your immune system.
DON’T avoid toys or products from Asia. Although the virus can live on surfaces for hours and possibly several days, it’s unlikely to survive the process of being moved from place to place in different temperatures and conditions.

DO check in on high-risk neighbors: older adults and people with serious chronic medical conditions. Monitor their food and medical supplies, and make sure they have people or organizations who can help if they get sick.

Dos and Don’ts When You Don’t Feel Well

DO seek help early if you have a fever, cough, and a hard time breathing. But don’t just drop into the nearest urgent care clinic. Call your doctor to find out the protocol first, to make sure you won’t spread the disease to others.